PASS Summit 2017 Wrap-Up – The People!

I need a new social media profile picture.

That’s one of the most important (non-technical) conclusions I drew from my week at PASS Summit 2017. It seemed like everywhere I went, I heard “I didn’t recognize you without the hat!” The picture I use on Slack, Twitter and Instagram is the same one I use here on my About Me page. This photo was taken in 2014 at the West Bend, WI Cache Bash and it’s one of the few photos of myself that I actually like (harsh shadows aside). I nearly did bring The Hat with me, but decided against it as it’s big, heavy, and not really an “indoor” hat.

But I digress. The point is, a lot of the people who I met at Summit only previously knew me with The Hat. But that also means that I was meeting a lot of people in person for the first time. And meeting new people is my second-favorite thing to do at PASS events – my favorite being catching up with everyone I already know.

Once I was registered for Summit, I told myself that I was going to make every after-hours event I could and meet everyone I could all over Summit & the associated events. I even signed up for the Summit Buddy program to meet people while helping them navigate their first Summit.

Monday

I didn’t even get through the hotel lobby in before spotting my first SQLFamily. En route from the front desk to the elevator, I crossed paths with Chrissy LeMaire (b|t), Rob Sewell (b|t), Constantine Kokkinos (b|t), and (I think – memory’s fuzzy here) Sander Stad (b|t)! I immediately introduced myself (with The Hat, no introductions would have been needed). We chatted for a moment but they had dinner plans they needed to get to, and I needed a bit of a rest from my trek before heading out to the networking dinner at Yard House.

I arrived at the Networking Dinner hosted by Lisa Bohm (though I didn’t meet her until Tuesday evening) and all the tables were full. I was early for my seating but after a short wait I was able to get a seat at a table with Jeremy Marx (t), whom I’d spoken with on Slack but we didn’t realize it for a few minutes (again, The Hat). A few moments later, we were joined by George Anderson (t), and then finally Kiril Kravstov (b|t) – another dbatools contributor!

Monday was over and I’d already met a half-dozen people. Incredible. I also managed to track down my friend Bill Schultz (t). We worked together a several years ago, and now despite living only an hour away from one another, we only see each other at Summit.

Tuesday

I had an early start as I needed to meet up with Chrissy to give her the badge ribbons I finally found buried in my backpack (not the first time I’ve lost things in its various pockets). Along the way, I bumped into another dbatools team member, Shawn Melton (b|t), who was awarded MVP status by Microsoft the following day.

A bunch of us hung out in the precon classroom and helped with setup, but as I was neither registered for the precon nor running it, I had to take off. I needed breakfast anyway. At the Daily Grille, I spotted Mike Fal (b|t), Rie Irish (b|t) and Monica Rathbun (b|t) at another booth and when I was finished with my meal, I stopped over to say hi. I worked with Mike when we were both at previous jobs, but I’d only spoken with Rie and Monica via Twitter previously.

I spent much of Tuesday in meetings for User Group leaders and SQL Saturday Organizers, but that just meant more new people to meet! On the lunch break, I walked down to Beecher’s with William Assaf (b|t) and Adrian Aucoin (b. Later in the day was the First Timers Orientation and Speed Networking. I attempted to arrange a meeting of my first-timers group just before that event but was only able to find half of them, Kathy & Jasper. The event is set up as a way to get you talking to new people, but unfortunately when you have a couple hundred people all in one room in pairs, all trying to have the same conversation, it gets very loud and a number of people left early. By chance, I found myself sitting next to James Livingston (t), a fellow Rochestarian!

After Orientation was the Welcome Reception. They had a live band! But wow was it loud. I hung out with Kiril and we managed to chat with a number of people including Luis Gonzales (t), Lisa, and Allen White (b|t) before making our way toward the exit with Chrissy and Rob to head over to Tap House for the dbatools team gathering. At Tap House, I met Amanda Crisp (b|t), whom I’d spoken with a few times on Twitter. I don’t recall what it was that put us each others’ respective radars, but it was good to finally meet!

Wednesday

As is tradition, Wednesday started with #SQLRun at 6 AM. 2017 was a bad year for me with regard to running, but the cool weather and good company like Nick Harshberger (t), Allen, Jen McCown (t) and James (who I ended up running with the whole time with) make it lots of fun. James and I clocked about 3 1/2 miles at a relaxed pace, though I had to take a bit of a breather coming up out of Pike’s Market (the ascent from Alaskan Way is tough).

After the run, I got cleaned up and braced myself for the madness that is Day One. On my way up the escalator to breakfast, I spotted someone I’ve wanted to meet for a while at one of the coffee shops and decided it was now or never. Summit is so large that if there’s someone you want to meet for the first time or someone you already know and want to catch up with, you have to do it the first time you’re anywhere near them. You may not get a second chance.

So, I detoured from my path to breakfast, apologized for interrupting his breakfast, and introduced myself to Brent Ozar (b|t). We chatted for about 5 minutes, he gave me a suggestion for mitigating some SQL Server performance issues I was dealing with at work (which I immediately texted to my colleague back at the office), and then he gave me a few Query Bucks and was gracious enough to pose for a selfie. Terrific start to the day.

After breakfast I meandered to the ballroom for the Keynote and found myself a prime seat right behind the blogger table. Closest to me was Kevin Kline (b|t), and we got to catch up for a few minutes before he had to get ready to liveblog the keynote. While we were talking Gail Shaw (b|t) arrived and I got to meet her as well!

Post-keynote, I found my way to the exhibitor hall. After checking in with a few folks, I bumped into Justin Whaley (b|t), who I discovered was working on some PowerShell functions for Red Gate tools just before Summit. We chatted a bit and decided to catch up later on to discuss his work.

One of the best things that happens at Summit is the chance encounters. As I started down the buffet table to get lunch, I looked up and discovered Deborah Melkin (b|t) across the table from me! Deborah spoke at SQL Saturday Albany last summer and had I been able to attend the event, her session was on my must-see list.

Wednesday evening was the big night for events. As an avid listener of the SQL Data Partners Podcast, I signed up for Carlos & Steve’s SQL Trail Mix event as soon as I heard about it. In their post-Summit podcast, I learned that they had a very limited number of tickets available for this event, so I’m glad I didn’t wait. Right away I saw Kathi Kellenberger (b|t) and Sheila Acker (t) (trivia: Sheila’s one of the first people I met & talked to for more than 5 seconds at my first Summit in 2012). Later, I’d find out that there were several people at this event whom I’d run into later in the week or I wanted to meet up with, but didn’t see.

As I left, I chatted with Carlos & Steve for a bit about Scouting; all three of us are currently or previously have been involved with Cub Scouts and/or Boy Scouts over the years (something I’ve noticed across SQL Family for a while).

Up next was Pike Brewing Company and the Sentry One party. The place was packed and I immediately found myself catching up with Kirsten Benzel (t) (we never got a chance to geek out about our watches though 😦 ), Argenis Fernandez (b|t) (whom I saw briefly at SQL Trail Mix) and Monica, plus I got to meet a few more folks milling around the bar. This was also the event where Lou talked me into trying out the 5X Stout Float, a custom concoction presented by one of the bartenders. I was skeptical at first, but wow. I’m going to have to try this one at home sometime.

Thursday

Thursday tends to be my “easy” day at Summit. It’s the “down” day between “gotta meet everyone I can ASAP” on Wednesday and “gotta catch everyone to say goodbye” on Friday. The big daytime event was the PowerShell panel hosted by Chrissy & Rob. We put out the call on Twitter and Slack to get as many dbatools contributors in the room so that we could get a group photo. By my count we had thirteen! At least one other team member had been at Summit but due to other obligations, he wasn’t able to make it for the photo. We’ll just ‘shop him later, right? I finally got meet John Hohengarten (t) and Jess Pomfret (t) there too (we snuck in a photobomb on Chrissy & Nic Cain (b|t)). I’ve spoken with John a lot on Slack, and Jess is another person with whom I’ve crossed paths on Twitter but never gotten to meet.

Thursday evening there were a few more sponsor parties but I was already signed up for Game Night hosted by Kevin Hill (b|t) at the convention center. Three years ago, I attended a small game night hosted by a sponsor in a shop a few blocks from the convention center, but it’s now a semi-official event with PASS backing – PASS even has a collection of tabletop games they bring to Summit for us! I don’t play a lot of board games (beyond the classics) at home but I’m looking to branch out, so I was really looking forward to this event. And it didn’t disappoint! It’s a small, quiet, laid-back gathering so you can chat with people while figuring out how to play the game you’ve picked out. Some welcome downtime.

But between the sessions and the games, we had some open time and needed to find food. Fortunately, Charlie Brown (t) was in the same boat but he’d heard about a good place nearby to get something quick. Charlie & I had talked a bit on Slack in the weeks leading up to Summit but hadn’t met yet, so we got to close that loop. As we waited in line for our food, Kathy and Bert Wagner (b|t) arrived unexpectedly so we all ate together, then several of us walked back to the convention center.

I teamed up with Kathy, Karin (another first-timer) and Swan Web (t) to learn/play Pandemic. Only Karin had played before so the game moved a little slower than with four experienced players, but the we had good time learning how it worked. A 100% collaborative game (as opposed to competitive) was a new experience for me and I ended up buying it to play at home! As things wound down I chatted with a couple of people including Kevin and Matt Cushing (b|t), once again being reminded that I was missing The Hat.

I thought this would be an early night, but making my way through the Sheraton I saw Justin hanging out in the lounge and stopped to catch up about his PowerShell functions for Red Gate tools. What might have been a 20-minute conversation ended up being several hours as we talked about anything and everything.

Friday

Friday’s kind of a sad day because it means having to say goodbye to everyone. I caught a couple of sessions but also spent a bit of time hanging out in the Community Zone. I also made sure to stop by the last few sponsors I needed to talk to, entered a few more of their drawings, and actually won one of them!

Earlier in the week I saw #SQLFamily badge ribbons and I was determined to find out where those came from. Turns out they were brought by ArcticDBA (b|t) and he wanted a dbatools ribbon, so we managed to finally meet up just before lunch and make an exchange.

Closing down the week, I made sure to attend Carlos L. Cachon’s session on baselining, something that I’m not doing a great job of right now. I discussed the highlight (for me) of that session in an earlier post. After the session, having outed myself as a member of the dbatools team, someone approached me with a question about installing the module, as he was having difficulty with one workstation. Unfortunately he’d already tried everything I could think of, so I suggested that he get onto Slack and ask the folks there. Shortly after Summit, he was there and got a solution to the problem.

The official festivities over, I grabbed my luggage and made my way to Tap House. Kevin mentioned that he was getting a bunch of people together there for dinner and drinks and while I had made plans to go to Crab Pot, I had time to pop in for a drink on the way. We quickly took over the billiards room in the back and by this point in the week, it was almost all familiar faces. I chatted with Shane O’Neill (b|t) for a while and he commented that he’d been to New York to visit family somewhat recently. We got to talking about it and I learned that on that trip, he was actually in my town. Incredible! Hopefully on a return visit we can meet up and maybe even schedule our local user group meeting so he can attend.

On to Crab Pot! I’ve heard about this dinner over the years, hosted by Tim Mitchell (b|t), and decided that since I had to do something besides sit in the airport terminal for five hours, I’d go. I don’t know how many people were there but it had to be at least 50 and it was very busy.

Recap

One thing that really struck me about the week was how little time I spent on social media looking for things to do. Instead, I was talking to people and finding or even making those things happen. I ended up turning the notifications from Slack and Twitter up to eleven to make sure that I didn’t miss anything critical there. As it turned out, my inattention to Twitter resulted in me missing an informal talk at the Microsoft booth about the new SQL Operations Studio, but oh well. On the other hand, I still got the notifications from people I was talking to.

At my past two Summits, I found myself completely drained and exhausted by the time Friday came around. Surprisingly, it didn’t happen this time around despite feeling like I did a lot more. I think I just paced myself better. Or maybe I’m becoming less introverted and talking to people is energizing me more.

I heard “I was hoping to meet you here” a few times outside the folks I’d pre-arranged seeing and that was a completely unexpected, but really awesome, experience.

Things I Did Well

  • Get up the gumption to introduce myself to new people
  • Stay off social media/my phone except where necessary
  • Find lunch tables with the fewest empty seats and join in the conversation, even/especially with strangers
  • Renewed connections with people I knew from past events
  • Not get completely exhausted

Things I Need to Work On

  • Step up the selfie game (including getting the courage to ask people for selfies)
  • Talk to more people at the booths in the exhibitor hall
  • Coordinate with my group if I join the Summit Buddies program
  • Get to a couple more sessions. I bought the session recordings so I can catch up, but sessions are still a good place to meet people

Now, to find that new social media profile photo…

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PASS Summit 2017 in Photos

My favorite photos from Summit 2017. Click to enlarge & see more detail; once in the larger view, you can use the your arrow keys to cycle through.

The Tech & Gear of PASS Summit 2017

Continuing my series of posts about my PASS Summit 2017 experience. This is about gadgets/gear I brought & software I used, the gadgets I saw around the convention center, and then a little about the hardware & software that was demoed.

Personal

Gadgets

I only brought three gadgets, plus their support items:

  • iPhone 8
  • iPad Air 2
  • Apple Watch Series 3
  • 4-port Anker wall charger
  • Anker 15K mAH battery pack
  • 2x Lightning cable (for the iPhone & iPad), 1x Micro-USB cable (to charge the battery pack), 1X Apple Watch charge cord

For the amount I used the iPad, I wish I had left it home. I only used it to watch a couple episodes of Stranger Things on the plane. The iPhone astounded me with its battery life. After charging overnight, it still had 30% left on it at 4:30 PM, even with heavy usage. Even better, it charged off the Anker battery pack fast– I was back up to 90% or better in an hour or less, much faster than I’ve experienced with other devices. This allowed me to top up the battery in the final session/event each afternoon and roam the city for the evening, comfortable that I had enough juice to last me until I returned to the hotel.

Software

Throughout the week, I used Day One to jot down important things – people I met, conversations I had, thoughts that came to mind, photos that I didn’t want to lose to the depths of my photo library, etc. I could have used paper and pen, but these were things I didn’t want to lose to my terrible handwriting. The other benefit of using Day One is that it records metadata about each entry – location, the current weather, how many steps I’d logged to that point in the day, even tags for categorization. Plus, it’s secured by TouchID. All told, I recorded 38 notes from the time I got to the airport on Monday to the time I left Seattle on Friday (although the first one, in which I mused about the TSA, is not fit for publication).

Because I’m skeptical of free open WiFi especially in such a large gathering, I bought a 1-week plan for Encrypt.me for protection.

Slack was used in several sessions and pre-cons throughout the week to drive Q&A – Brent Ozar & Erik Darling used it for their pre-con, the dbatools crew used it for theirs, and it was used for the PowerShell panel discussion as well. There was general chatter on Slack as well, but I think a lot more was going on on Twitter.

I set up an IFTTT recipe to capture #PASSSummit tweets to a Google Drive spreadsheet and it collected over 10K tweets over the week; someday I’ll go back through them to see what I missed (I set one up for #SQLFamily too, but haven’t reviewed that one yet) and make the full dataset available as a download. Twitter seems to be better/more manageable for getting notifications than Slack.

Late on Thursday, I spotted this tweet but failed to note who wrote it (had to search just now):

Intrigued, I downloaded the app and gave it a test run in a couple sessions and this was my response:

If you are anywhere you find a need to take a photo of a whiteboard, projector screen, or document, get this app. Apple may have introduced document scanning in iOS 11 but this is several levels above and it has earned a permanent spot on my phone. It automatically straightens/de-skews images and makes them very readable, then OCRs them. It even works for business cards and integrates with a number of apps/services already on your phone (OneNote, Photos, Mail, etc.). Here’s an example:

Photo of a slide, right off the camera.
The same slide, after being processed by Lens

The one place Lens falls short (in my experience thus far) is with color images, at least in Whiteboard mode. But if the content is text and line art, it’s quite useful.

Other

Despite my terrible handwriting, I still like taking notes at events like Summit (or even in meetings at the office) with pen and paper as I find that writing helps cement the ideas in my mind. My weapons of choice are the Uniball Jetstream 2 pen (seems they’re no longer producing this one, or maybe I misremembered the model; the Jetstream RT is hopefully similar) and Staples Sustainable Earth 9 1/2″ x 6″ spiral-bound notebook. The notebook has a couple pockets for stashing stuff and the covers are rigid enough that they protect the pages and I don’t have to put the notebook on a table to write.

My Eddie Bauer sling backpack got over-stuffed in a hurry. Too much swag plus my water bottle and other daily carry stuff. I need to find a replacement for it but don’t want to give up the convenience/comfort of the single-shoulder sling style. On the bright side, its obnoxious orange color makes me easy to spot from across the convention center.

Around the convention center

I didn’t see a lot of people walking around with iPads or Android tablets. Maybe when the iPad Pro & Apple Pencil become more widespread we’ll see people taking notes on them instead of paper. I did see a number of Microsoft Surface computers amongst attendees, and a few laptops. Lugging a full laptop around all week sounds like a drag (not to mention the battery anxiety) but if I had a well-spec’d Surface and large enough backpack, I might consider taking it.

The WSCC WiFi seemed shaky on Tuesday, but settled down and worked well for the remainder of the week. This seems to be the pattern at Summit, in my experience.

There was a common thread running through almost every session I attended as well as the Tuesday meetings, of the projectors blinking on and off for no apparent reason. It wasn’t any one presenter’s computer, nor was it any one room. It was bizarre but after a while, I think we all got used to it.

New stuff demoed

In Wednesday’s keynote, Microsoft ran several PowerBI (and PowerBI-adjacent) demos, but I didn’t find them particularly captivating. They were quite brief, and didn’t get into the technical work that made it possible. The HPE ProLiant DL380 Gen10 was shown off, boasting high performance thanks to persisted memory. All these demos were very shiny, but very brief. This is a technical audience – give us some more depth here, please.

The item that I found most interesting spent about 5 seconds on screen – a desktop app that looked like someone stuffed SQL Server Management Studio into Visual Studio Code, then a quick slide where the name SQL Server Operations Studio was revealed, along with a note that it’s a cross-platform GUI for managing SQL Server. Ever since SQL Server for Linux/macOS was announced, I’ve wanted this, and they skimmed over it in 5 seconds! Apparently there was a demo session at the Microsoft booth in the Exhibitor Hall later, but only advertised via Twitter; I didn’t hear about it until Thursday.

dbatools at PASS Summit 2017

I registered for Summit about a month before getting actively involved in the dbatools project, so when I saw the team was running a pre-con and I was going to meet them, I was pretty excited. It was amazing getting to meet and hang out with Chrissy, Rob, CK, Shane, Jess, John, Shawn, Aaron, Ben, Kiril, Shane, and Drew (sorry if I forgot anyone!), even if it was only for a moment.

But I’ll have another post about the people of Summit. This one’s about dbatools being talked about all over Summit and my experience with that as a member of the team. I’m certain there’s a heavy amount of confirmation bias here, but dbatools seems to have caught fire in the SQL Server community. And with good reason!

I was able to hand out about 300 of the dbatools fan ribbons I brought with me; half went to pre-con attendees, and the rest were handed out on the conference center floor at random. Sitting at the PowersShell table at the BoF lunches, people would join us and say “hey, I’ve heard about this dbatools thing but haven’t had a chance to learn it yet.” People would see mine and ask for one as they’d heard about the project and even used it themselves.

Rob Sewell talked about it at the SentryOne booth. I heard on Twitter and around the conference center that dbatools was getting mentioned in a number of speakers’ sessions, even the ones that didn’t advertise it in their abstracts. There was a panel discussion about PowerShell in general, spearheaded by the key dbatools team members and of course dbatools was talked about there. But the star of that session was Ken Van Hyning, aka SQL Tools Guy (t), talking about the roots and evolution of many of the tools we use and where he sees them going. He also hold us how we can impact the direction of the current tools and make pitches for new ones. Key takeaways:

  • Cross-platform, open-source where possible seems to be the way of the future
  • There’s a lot of work to be done to migrate the infrastructure and tooling around the tools to get the existing ones there (I think this is why we’re seeing new tooling come out instead of direct ports)
  • The squeaky wheel gets the love, so make your voice heard on Microsoft Connect and Twitter!
We even managed to get a group photo with the dbatools team members who were in the building!

After all the “I can’t believe this is happening!” moments through the week, the final session on Friday was the icing on the cake. I was in Carlos L Chacon’s session Measuring Performance Through Baselines and dbatools popped up on one of his slides.

dbatools on Carlos’s slide

Later, Carlos demonstrated a couple of functions, Get-DbaAgentAlert and Get-DbaUptime. The latter sounded familiar, so I jumped on Github and checked the history to confirm. Yep, it’s one of the functions I’d done some (non-CBH) work on. Which means that code I wrote was executed in a PASS Summit presentation! Yes, it’s a small thing and I’m the only person who even knew it as it was happening, but it happened. Which is pretty awesome.

Sleepless for Seattle

PASS Summit 2017 is only a week away and to say I’m excited about it would be an understatement. This will be my third trip to the epic gathering of SQL Server and Microsoft data platform professionals and each time, it gets better and better.

Not only is this a time for learning and networking, it’s a giant #sqlfamily reunion. The list of people I’m excited to see is long, both people I’ve known for a while and new friends I’ve only spoken with online.

How to find me:

As a “Summit Buddy” this year, I’ll be helping four Summit first-timers navigate the week. We’ve already been in contact via email and we’ll be meeting for the first time at the First-Timer Orientation & Speed Networking event late Tuesday afternoon. We’ll check in a few times through the week, probably over breakfast or lunch and hopefully see each other in the Community Zone and sessions as well. I’m hopeful that they’ll enjoy Summit as much as I do.

I’m still working out my session schedule. So many great sessions to choose from! My pre-conference and after-hours schedules are shaping up nicely though. For the first time ever, I’m attending as a User Group co-leader and SQL Saturday Organizer, so I’ll be in meetings for those on Tuesday.

Events to find me at outside the normal Summit hours:

  • Monday, 7:00 PM – Networking dinner
  • Tuesday, 4:45 PM – 6:00 PM – First-Timer Orientation & Speed Networking
  • Tuesday, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM – Welcome Reception
  • Tuesday, 8:00 PM – dbatools team gathering
  • Wednesday, 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM – SQL Trail Mix
  • Thursday, 7:00 PM – 10:30 PM – Games Night
  • One Summit tradition I’m undecided about right now is SQL run. It’s no longer an official event but people still do it. I’ve got a sore leg right now and if I can’t get it fixed I’ll pass on the running. Seattle is a nice place to run, especially by the waterfront. But it’s hilly.

As with every Summit, the schedule is jam-packed and it’s going to be exhausting. I can’t wait.

dbatools Badge Ribbons at PASS Summit

One of the (many) fun things to do at PASS Summit is to check out the ribbons people have attached to their badges. Some are witty or goofy, others informational, others technical, and still more that let you express how you identify with a community within the community.

To celebrate dbatools and the awesome team & community around it, two limited edition badges will be available from/distributed by me and a handful of other folks all week at Summit. Check ’em out:

Be on the lookout for these badges and talk to us about dbatools! What you like, what you’d like to see changed, new feature ideas, questions about how to use functions, anything at all. Even if you’ve never used dbatools, we love talking about it and showing people the awesome things they can do with it so please, introduce yourself!

PASS Summit: Things to Do, People to See

PASS Summit is nearly upon us. I’m excited to be attending my second Summit in Seattle and cannot wait to get there to see everyone. With one Summit and a few SQL Saturdays under my belt I’ve got a laundry list of things and people I can’t miss, and very little time to pack it all into.

Let’s Meet!

The greatest part of Summit (and SQL Saturday) for me is meeting people and exchanging ideas. If you haven’t experienced it, #SQLFamily is amazing. When I reached the convention center two years ago, the first feeling that hit me was “I finally found my people!” We’re all friendly, I swear. Just say “hi, I’m <your name here>.”  I guarantee you will find people who are into the same stuff you’re into, and I’m not talking just talking about SQL Server. Music, dance, outdoor activities, all kinds of stuff. We have a common thing that brought us together, but that’s not what keeps us together. It is an amazing community and it just keeps getting better. On Sunday, as you’re decompressing from the event and travel, you will miss these people who you didn’t even know a week before.

You can even connect strangers with common interests. In 2012, I met someone over a power outlet who asked if I’d done anything with a particular piece of hardware and what I thought of it. Turns out that I hadn’t, but I knew that a former co-worker was also in attendance and he had used the hardware, so I gave them each others’ contact information.

Ping me on Twitter, find me at one of the places/events listed below, breakfast or lunch in the dining hall, or if you think you see me passing in the hall (picture on my Twitter profile), say something (and if it’s not me, you’ll meet someone else, which is still awesome). Maybe even dinner at the airport on Friday evening.

Get on Twitter

So many things happen at Summit which are announced and/or organized via Twitter. The main hashtag to follow is (I think) #summit14 but once you hit the ground you’ll start figuring out who and what to follow to get all the dirt.

Schedule

Tuesday

I’m arriving in Seattle late Tuesday morning and doing some sightseeing before checking into the hotel and Summit late in the afternoon. Then it’s off to the welcome reception. The first of several visits to Tap House Grill may be in order too.

Wednesday

Wednesday starts dark & early with #SQLRun at 6 AM. I had a great time getting a 5K in before dawn at my first Summit and I’m sure this one will be great too. Don’t forget to bring the right gear; it’s pre-dawn and right now the forecast is for 50°F and rain (in Seattle. Go figure).

Aside from the sessions throughout the day, I’ll probably be found in the Community Zone. I’ll also be serving as an Ambassador helping to direct people to the dining hall for lunch, posted outside room 4C so stop by and say hi.

Wednesday evening, I’m hosting a dinner for geocachers at the Daily Grill at 6:15 PM. If you’re a cacher, or just curious about it, stop by!

Once we’ve wrapped up there, I’ll go wherever the wind may take me; probably back to the Tap House.

Thursday

Thursday is my light day at Summit. I don’t have any sessions double-booked and the only event I really need to catch is the Argenis Without Borders folks in their fuzzy rainbow leggings.

Thursday evening I’ll be at the Ray Gun Lounge for Table Top Game Night. I’m looking forward to getting to know folks there and learn some new games. We don’t play a lot of table top games at home and I’d like to change that.

Friday

Lots more sessions on Friday, plus winding everything down. By the afternoon, I’ll probably be beat and just trying to rest at the Community Zone.

I fly out late Friday night, so I’ll be trying to find dinner somewhere between the convention center and airport. I’ll probably kill a lot of time in the terminal by wandering around, playing Ingress.

Packing List

At my first Summit, I learned a few lessons about what to take and what not to take. The most important thing to bring: empty space for all the stuff you’ll bring home. SWAG from the exhibitors, souvenirs, books and more. Next most important: power! Electrical outlets are few and far between, and there will be 5000 people vying for them to top off their phones and tablets. A quick rundown of some of the stuff that might not be obvious to bring (or easily forgotten) that I’m packing:

  • Small (1 pint) widemouth water bottle. I’m partial to this Nalgene bottle I got at a 5K earlier this year.
  • NUUN electrolyte tabs. Water gets boring after a while. These will help you stave off SQLPlague (don’t forget your vitamins too!).
  • Comfortable shoes. You’ll be on your feet a lot and walking even more; the convention center is big. Not to mention the evening activities.
  • A small notepad for taking non-session notes – phone numbers, names, etc. I love my Field Notes notebook.
  • A larger notepad for taking notes in sessions. Oh, and don’t forget a pen or three. I’ve tried doing notes on a tablet and on a computer, and it just doesn’t work as well as paper & pen for me. Bonus: no batteries!
  • Hand sanitizer. Because when you have 5000 people in one place, germs get around in a hurry no matter how careful you are.
  • good wall charger for your devices. I found myself short chargers last time and had to buy one at Radio Shack. It didn’t cut it. This one has two USB ports that charge at 2.1A, which will give you a good boost when you get near a plug, and you can share with a friend. It’ll also recharge pretty much anything while you sleep. Best of all, it’s really compact.
  • A good external battery pack. Matt Slocum (b | t) got me hooked on the Anker E5 15000 mAH battery. 2 ports so you can share with a friend and it’ll recharge most phones 4-5 times from a completely empty battery.
  • Plenty of USB cords to go with both of the above.
  • Business cards! I ordered mine at the office too late last time and had to get some made at Staples in a pinch.
  • A small, light backpack to carry all of this in (well, not the shoes). Session rooms get cramped, so carrying a big pack can be a pain.
  • A lock code on my phone and tablet. I normally don’t use one but at any large gathering like this, it’s better to be safe.
  • A list of the people I need to see/find/meet/reconnect with.

This Summit is going to be a blast. I cannot wait. There’s only two things I don’t look forward to:

  1. Having to sleep (I’ll miss stuff!)
  2. It’ll eventually end

Next Tuesday cannot come soon enough.